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Инстаграм National Geographic: наша планета прекрасна!

Снимки National Geographic уже почти сто лет являют собой легенду фотографии. Изображения из инстаграма @natgeo — напоминание нам о том, что наша планета чертовски красива и разнообразна! За один день в аккаунте могут появиться снимки ужина при свечах в Лаосе, орлов, тусующихся со львами в Ботсване, протестов в Балтиморе и эскимоса возле полярного круга.

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This is what corn seed looks like when it is treated with the neonicotinoid pesticide Chlothianidin. Each color indicates a different concentration of the pesticide. Neonicotinoids have been getting a lot of scrutiny lately because they have been found to be very harmful to honeybees. For example, one of the purple corn seeds shown here has enough pesticide to kill 100,000 bees if they came in direct contact with it. The tricky part is, bees typically don’t come in direct contact with treated seed since they are planted directly underground. Instead, the pesticide penetrates the seed and becomes incorporated into all of the plant’s tissue. So bees come into contact with low doses over longer periods of time as they collect contaminated pollen. In the lab, low doses have been shown to kill honeybee larvae and affect their navigation abilities. However, it is harder to prove what is going on out in the field. On top of that, neonicotinoids were designed to replace older pesticides that were more harmful to humans and other vertebrates. So it turns into a complicated trade-off when it comes to regulating these chemicals. Photographed by Anand Varma (@anandavarma) for the honeybee story in the May 2015 issue of @natgeo. #onassignment #honeybee #pesticides #chemicals @thephotosociety #corn #neonics

Фото опубликовано National Geographic (@natgeo)

 

 

photo by @randyolson | words by @neilshea13 — Rain fell in the afternoon, turning the earth into slime and the water into oxblood. We took the boat upriver and later, returning, came upon this puzzle: on the steep shore ahead a woman shouted to a naked man who stood in the river gripping the horn of a terrified cow. Only the cow’s head broke water. Its eyes rolled, nostrils flared, it moaned and moaned. The river did this—you were always sliding from one story into the next, swift through the country’s unfinished business. Rarely did you know why something started or how it turned out. The man was trying to haul the white beast ashore. As it happened, he was just a good Samaritan. He’d been strolling past on his way to a party, his hair richly shaped with butter and clay. He heard the woman shouting, and so came over to look. Now he was soaked, and the cow was mad. Every time he caught the dumb beast it lunged away and swam out toward deep water where crocodiles waited. Anyone might have been angry, but river people are also cattle people, and later the man said this: Imagine how it looked to the cow. No earth beneath your hooves, no answer from your herd, the sky a mean gray gash. Every breath drowns you a little more and you have no words for the terror down below. Well. Eventually he caught the cow and we jumped down and together dragged it out. I thought the animal would die right then but it didn't. The woman shook our hands in thanks and then went over to the shuddering creature. She laid her palm on its head, pulled its damp hair through her fingers. You idiot, she said. We are so far from home. For the last six years, Randy Olson and I have been documenting culture, change, and conflict in the watershed that connects southern Ethiopia and northern Kenya. In the August issue of @natgeo magazine we’ll publish the latest in our series, #NGwatershedstories. Join us at @randyolson and @neilshea13 as we follow water through the desert. #2009 #africa #ethiopia #omoriver #kara #hamar #rivers #cow #water #animals @geneticislands #documentary #everydayafrica #everydayeverywhere #journalism #instaessay #natgeo @thephotosociety

Фото опубликовано National Geographic (@natgeo)

 

 

 

 

 

photo by @randyolson | words by @neilshea13 — A few years later George W. Bush would come to this place. After he left office. For vacation. Several black helicopters thumping over the desert. He stayed two days. Camped where we camped, met people we had known. Along the Omo he was admired. People thought him strong and wished him well. Not many Muslims in that low country. Of course, his arrival meant he knew. The river world was ending and he wanted to see it. Strange to think of him resting in the evenings on the high bank where we caught catfish and killed them with a shovel. Where each morning the green monkeys pissed on our tents and once, while I stood under the bucket shower, army ants crawled up my legs and on signal started biting everything. I ran out from the greasy stream naked and cursing, white boy on fire, covered in welts big as quarters. Bet that didn’t happen to W. Truth is, I’d love to know how he saw it. Who he spoke to. If he painted and what. Did he even bring his oils, his easel, his wife? No one down there would’ve asked him any tough questions. They would’ve been generous, curious. Maybe they heard he owned a ranch. Maybe they heard he owned cattle. He might’ve talked about that. Everyone would have circled in to listen. They’d have asked How many head do you have? Of what kind and color? And when the president had finished his accounting no doubt someone in back would’ve laughed and said That’s nothing! Tell us about your wives! For the last six years, Randy Olson and I have been documenting culture, change, and conflict in the watershed that connects southern Ethiopia and northern Kenya. In the August issue of @natgeo magazine we’ll publish the latest in our series, #NGwatershedstories. Join us at @randyolson and @neilshea13 as we follow water through the desert. #2009 #africa #ethiopia #omoriver #kwegu #life #rivers #conservation @geneticislands #documentary #everydayafrica #president #georgewbush #journalism #instaessay #natgeo @thephotosociety

Фото опубликовано National Geographic (@natgeo)

 

Photo by @mattiasklumofficial Sharing is caring! I photographed this polar bear female and her cub enjoying a seal meal in Svalbard. At birth, the polar bear cubs only weigh about 500 to 700 g (17-25 oz.) and are about 30 cm (12 in.) long. Males are usually born slightly larger than females. Please go to @mattiasklumofficial to see who got the leftovers from this meal! The average fat content of polar bear milk is 33%, similar to the milkfat of other marine mammals. For comparison, human milk has a 3-5% fat content. Cubs begin eating solid food as soon as their mother makes her first kill on the sea ice , about three to four months of age. The cubs grow very quickly on their mother's fat rich milk and on seal blubber. By eight months of age, they weigh more than 45 kg (99 lb.).Mother polar bears are known to be extremely protective of their young, even risking their own lives in their cubs' defense. #meal #seal #polarbear #protectwildlife #conservationphotography #svalbard #mattiasklum #protectthearctic #stopclimatechange #un #iucn #photooftheday @thephotosociety @mattiasklumofficial @natgeocreative @bigworldsmallplanet @natgeo

Фото опубликовано National Geographic (@natgeo)

 

 

 

 

photo by @randyolson | words by @neilshea13 — In the old days, when my father was a child, we didn’t have rifles. We carried spears and clubs, and rifles were for white men and soldiers. But slowly they came in from the west, from Sudan, and everything changed. We Mursi live on the far side of the Omo and there are no bridges, so we were among the last to get them. For a while it was very bad. Back then, if hot-heads came downriver with guns, they took what they wanted. No sense could reach them, no speech was sweet in their ears. Many times we were victims and could only run into the bush or die. Now, we have rifles and our enemies think twice. Everyone thinks twice. Listen, a man must have these things: land, cattle, children. Without land you cannot feed the cattle. Without cattle you cannot pay for a bride. Without a bride you will not have children. Lacking these things leaves a man feeling hungry. Only when he has them all can he be taken seriously. And then he picks up a rifle to defend them. Do you understand? Yes, it’s true that the forest has become quieter. Guns changed that, too. There were once many animals—buffalo, gazelles, lions, leopards. Elephants were very dangerous and sometimes crashed through the village. On the river hippos were most savage of all. Today the hunters find far fewer animals, and a kind of silence waits in the bush. But I won’t say it’s bad. Fools and white men may miss the lion. Missionaries may talk of mercy. I can show you a place where bones still cover the ground, and that is the silence I remember. For the last six years, Randy Olson and I have been documenting culture, change, and conflict in the watershed that connects southern Ethiopia and northern Kenya. In the August issue of @natgeo magazine we’ll publish the latest in our series, #NGwatershedstories. Join us at @randyolson and @neilshea13 as we follow water through the desert. #2009 #africa #ethiopia #omoriver #mursi #ak47 #guns #hunting #life #rivers #conservation @geneticislands #documentary #everydayafrica #portrait #journalism #instaessay #natgeo @thephotosociety

Фото опубликовано National Geographic (@natgeo)

 

 

photo by @randyolson | words by @neilshea13 — One day he went into the forest alone. He had in mind what he wanted. Not every boy knows with such clarity who he prefers for a companion but he had decided on a baboon. The boy somehow captured the animal. The details are vague. This is what he said. To tell you the truth, I don’t believe it. Though he had a certain kind of courage no boy this small has any business chasing dangerous animals around so far outside the Suri village. Especially not in the nurseries of big mother baboons, which are all teeth and banshee shrieking. In any case the beginning is irrelevant. There is always a boy like this, and a baboon without a name. For a while they would be great friends. Everyday they wandered and played together. House to house, aunt to aunt, asking food, wasting time. They are coming to be almost the same age, human and baboon lives passing like satellites, their orbits nearing, nearing. In the afternoons they walked in long cool shadows, just the pair of them. In the evenings the baboon slept curled beside him. It was saddest because you knew it couldn’t last. After this brief perigee the baboon would grow bigger, stronger, surpassing the boy’s young courage, willful and unpredictable as everything that lives. Then the decision so far suspended would come down, and it would not be the boy’s to make. But let’s don’t talk about that. The daydream can play out a little longer. See how the boy has painted its face. See how it holds him, how it desires to be held. This is a dream you will recognize, one we’ve shared. To be understood for a moment beyond words. For the last six years, Randy Olson and I have been documenting culture, change, and conflict in the watershed that connects southern Ethiopia and northern Kenya. In the August issue of @natgeo magazine we’ll publish the latest in our series, #NGwatershedstories. Join us at @randyolson and @neilshea13 as we follow water through the desert. #2009 #africa #ethiopia #omoriver #suri #baboon #tradition #rivers #conservation @geneticislands #documentary #instajournalism #instaessay #takenotes #natgeo @thephotosociety #portrait

Фото опубликовано National Geographic (@natgeo)

 
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